Jump to Navigation

Feed aggregator

Laracon EU 2019 Amsterdam

PHP News - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 10:26
Categories: PHP

New – Open Distro for Elasticsearch

AWS Blog - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 08:19

Elasticsearch is a distributed, document-oriented search and analytics engine. It supports structured and unstructured queries, and does not require a schema to be defined ahead of time. Elasticsearch can be used as a search engine, and is often used for web-scale log analytics, real-time application monitoring, and clickstream analytics.

Originally launched as a true open source project, some of the more recent additions to Elasticsearch are proprietary. My colleague Adrian explains our motivation to start Open Distro for Elasticsearch in his post, Keeping Open Source Open. As strong believers in, and supporters of, open source software, we believe this project will help continue to accelerate open source Elasticsearch innovation.

Open Distro for Elasticsearch
Today we are launching Open Distro for Elasticsearch. This is a value-added distribution of Elasticsearch that is 100% open source (Apache 2.0 license) and supported by AWS. Open Distro for Elasticsearch leverages the open source code for Elasticsearch and Kibana. This is not a fork; we will continue to send our contributions and patches upstream to advance these projects.

In addition to Elasticsearch and Kibana, the first release includes a set of advanced security, event monitoring & alerting, performance analysis, and SQL query features (more on those in a bit). In addition to the source code repo, Open Distro for Elasticsearch and Kibana are available as RPM and Docker containers, with separate downloads for the SQL JDBC and the PerfTop CLI. You can run this code on your laptop, in your data center, or in the cloud.

Contributions are welcome, as are bug reports and feature requests.

Inside Open Distro for Elasticsearch
Let’s take a quick look at the features that we are including in Open Distro for Elasticsearch. Some of these are currently available in Amazon Elasticsearch Service; others will become available in future updates.

Security – This plugin that supports node-to-node encryption, five types of authentication (basic, Active Directory, LDAP, Kerberos, and SAML), role-based access controls at multiple levels (clusters, indices, documents, and fields), audit logging, and cross-cluster search so that any node in a cluster can run search requests across other nodes in the cluster. Learn More

Event Monitoring & Alerting – This feature notifies you when data from one or more Elasticsearch indices meets certain conditions. You could, for example, notify a Slack channel if an application logs more than five HTTP 503 errors in an hour. Monitoring is based on jobs that run on a defined schedule, checking indices against trigger conditions, and raising alerts when a condition has been triggered. Learn More

Deep Performance Analysis – This is a REST API that allows you to query a long list of performance metrics for your cluster. You can access the metrics programmatically or you can visualize them using perf top and other perf tools. Learn More

SQL Support – This feature allows you to query your cluster using SQL statements. It is an improved version of the elasticsearch-sql plugin, and supports a rich set of statements.

This is just the beginning; we have more in the works, and also look forward to your contributions and suggestions!

Jeff;

 

Categories: Cloud

Bulgaria PHP Conference 2019

PHP News - Sun, 03/10/2019 - 00:32
Categories: PHP

PHP 7.1.27 Released

PHP News - Thu, 03/07/2019 - 03:49
Categories: PHP

PHP 7.2.16 Released

PHP News - Thu, 03/07/2019 - 02:08
Categories: PHP

PHP 7.3.3 Release Announcement

PHP News - Thu, 03/07/2019 - 01:10
Categories: PHP

Building serverless apps with components from the AWS Serverless Application Repository

AWS Blog - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 10:46

Guest post by AWS Serverless Hero Aleksandar Simovic. Aleksandar is a Senior Software Engineer at Science Exchange and co-author of “Serverless Applications with Node.js” with Slobodan Stojanovic, published by Manning Publications. He also writes on Medium on both business and technical aspects of serverless.

Many of you have built a user login or an authorization service from scratch a dozen times. And you’ve probably built another dozen services to process payments and another dozen to export PDFs. We’ve all done it, and we’ve often all done it redundantly. Using the AWS Serverless Application Repository, you can now spend more of your time and energy developing business logic to deliver the features that matter to customers, faster.

What is the AWS Serverless Application Repository?

The AWS Serverless Application Repository allows developers to deploy, publish, and share common serverless components among their teams and organizations. Its public library contains community-built, open-source, serverless components that are instantly searchable and deployable with customizable parameters and predefined licensing. They are built and published using the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM), the infrastructure as code, YAML language, used for templating AWS resources.

How to use AWS Serverless Application Repository in production

I wanted to build an application that enables customers to select a product and pay for it. Sounds like a substantial effort, right? Using AWS Serverless Application Repository, it didn’t actually take me much time.

Broadly speaking, I built:

  • A product page with a Buy button, automatically tied to the Stripe Checkout SDK. When a customer chooses Buy, the page displays the Stripe Checkout payment form.
  • A Stripe payment service with an API endpoint that accepts a callback from Stripe, charges the customer, and sends a notification for successful transactions.

For this post, I created a pre-built sample static page that displays the product details and has the Stripe Checkout JavaScript on the page.

Even with the pre-built page, integrating the payment service is still work. But many other developers have built a payment application at least once, so why should I spend time building identical features? This is where AWS Serverless Application Repository came in handy.

Find and deploy a component

First, I searched for an existing component in the AWS Serverless Application Repository public library. I typed “stripe” and opted in to see applications that created custom IAM roles or resource policies. I saw the following results:

I selected the application titled api-lambda-stripe-charge and chose Deploy on the component’s detail page.

Before I deployed any component, I inspected it to make sure it was safe and production-ready.

Evaluate a component

The recommended approach for evaluating an AWS Serverless Application Repository component is a four-step process:

  1. Check component permissions.
  2. Inspect the component implementation.
  3. Deploy and run the component in a restricted environment.
  4. Monitor the component’s behavior and cost before using in production.

This might appear to negate the quick delivery benefits of AWS Serverless Application Repository, but in reality, you only verify each component one time. Then you can easily reuse and share the component throughout your company.

Here’s how to apply this approach while adding the Stripe component.

1. Check component permissions

There are two types of components: public and private. Public components are open source, while private components do not have to be. In this case, the Stripe component is public. I reviewed the code to make sure that it doesn’t give unnecessary permissions that could potentially compromise security.

In this case, the Stripe component is on GitHub. On the component page, I opened the template.yaml file. There was only one AWS Lambda function there, so I found the Policies attribute and reviewed the policies that it uses.

  CreateStripeCharge: Type: AWS::Serverless::Function Properties: Handler: index.handler Runtime: nodejs8.10 Timeout: 10 Policies: - SNSCrudPolicy: TopicName: !GetAtt SNSTopic.TopicName - Statement: Effect: Allow Action: - ssm:GetParameters Resource: !Sub arn:${AWS::Partition}:ssm:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:parameter/${SSMParameterPrefix}/*

The component was using a predefined AWS SAM policy template and a custom one. These predefined policy templates are sets of AWS permissions that are verified and recommended by the AWS security team. Using these policies to specify resource permissions is one of the recommended practices for serverless components on AWS Serverless Application Repository. The other custom IAM policy allows the function to retrieve AWS System Manager parameters, which is the best practice to store secure values, such as the Stripe secret key.

2. Inspect the component implementation

I wanted to ensure that the component’s main business logic did only what it was meant to do, which was to create a Stripe charge. It’s also important to look out for unknown third-party HTTP calls to prevent leaks. Then I reviewed this project’s dependencies. For this inspection, I used PureSec, but tools like those offered by Protego are another option.

The main business logic was in the charge-customer.js file. It revealed straightforward logic to simply invoke the Stripe create charge and then publish a notification with the created charge. I saw this reflected in the following code:

return paymentProcessor.createCharge(token, amount, currency, description) .then(chargeResponse => { createdCharge = chargeResponse; return pubsub.publish(createdCharge, TOPIC_ARN); }) .then(() => createdCharge) .catch((err) => { console.log(err); throw err; });

The paymentProcessor and pubsub values are adapters for the communication with Stripe and Amazon SNS, respectively. I always like to look and see how they work.

3. Deploy and run the component in a restricted environment

Maintaining a separate, restricted AWS account in which to test your serverless applications is a best practice for serverless development. I always ensure that my test account has strict AWS Billing and Amazon CloudWatch alarms in place.

I signed in to this separate account, opened the Stripe component page, and manually deployed it. After deployment, I needed to verify how it ran. Because this component only has one Lambda function, I looked for that function in the Lambda console and opened its details page so that I could verify the code.

4. Monitor behavior and cost before using a component in production

When everything works as expected in my test account, I usually add monitoring and performance tools to my component to help diagnose any incidents and evaluate component performance. I often use Epsagon and Lumigo for this, although adding those steps would have made this post too long.

I also wanted to track the component’s cost. To do this, I added a strict Billing alarm that tracked the component cost and the cost of each AWS resource within it.

After the component passed these four tests, I was ready to deploy it by adding it to my existing product-selection application.

Deploy the component to an existing application

To add my Stripe component into my existing application, I re-opened the component Review, Configure, and Deploy page and chose Copy as SAM Resource. That copied the necessary template code to my clipboard. I then added it to my existing serverless application by pasting it into my existing AWS SAM template, under Resources. It looked like the following:

Resources: ShowProduct: Type: AWS::Serverless::Function Properties: Handler: index.handler Runtime: nodejs8.10 Timeout: 10 Events: Api: Type: Api Properties: Path: /product/:productId Method: GET   apilambdastripecharge: Type: AWS::Serverless::Application Properties: Location: ApplicationId: arn:aws:serverlessrepo:us-east-1:375983427419:applications/api-lambda-stripe-charge SemanticVersion: 3.0.0 Parameters: # (Optional) Cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) Origin. You can specify a single origin, all origins with "*", or leave it empty and no CORS is applied. CorsOrigin: YOUR_VALUE # This component assumes that the Stripe secret key needed to use the Stripe Charge API is stored as SecureStrings in Parameter Store under the prefix defined by this parameter. See the component README.        # SSMParameterPrefix: lambda-stripe-charge # Uncomment to override the default value Outputs: ApiUrl: Value: !Sub https://${ServerlessRestApi}.execute-api.${AWS::Region}.amazonaws.com/Stage/product/123 Description: The URL of the sample API Gateway

I copied and pasted an AWS::Serverless::Application AWS SAM resource, which points to the component by ApplicationId and its SemanticVersion. Then, I defined the component’s parameters.

  • I set CorsOrigin to “*” for demonstration purposes.
  • I didn’t have to set the SSMParameterPrefix value, as it picks up a default value. But I did set up my Stripe secret key in the Systems Manager Parameter Store, by running the following command:

aws ssm put-parameter --name lambda-stripe-charge/stripe-secret-key --value --type SecureString --overwrite

In addition to parameters, components also contain outputs. An output is an externalized component resource or value that you can use with other applications or components. For example, the output for the api-lambda-stripe-charge component is SNSTopic, an Amazon SNS topic. This enables me to attach another component or business logic to get a notification when a successful payment occurs. For example, a lambda-send-email-ses component that sends an email upon successful payment could be attached, too.

To finish, I ran the following two commands:

aws cloudformation package --template-file template.yaml --output-template-file output.yaml --s3-bucket YOUR_BUCKET_NAME

aws cloudformation deploy --template-file output.yaml --stack-name product-show-n-pay --capabilities CAPABILITY_IAM

For the second command, you could add parameter overrides as needed.

My product-selection and payment application was successfully deployed!

Summary

AWS Serverless Application Repository enables me to share and reuse common components, services, and applications so that I can really focus on building core business value.

In a few steps, I created an application that enables customers to select a product and pay for it. It took a matter of minutes, not hours or days! You can see that it doesn’t take long to cautiously analyze and check a component. That component can now be shared with other teams throughout my company so that they can eliminate their redundancies, too.

Now you’re ready to use AWS Serverless Application Repository to accelerate the way that your teams develop products, deliver features, and build and share production-ready applications.

Categories: Cloud

Learn about AWS Services & Solutions – March AWS Online Tech Talks

AWS Blog - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 10:46

Join us this March to learn about AWS services and solutions. The AWS Online Tech Talks are live, online presentations that cover a broad range of topics at varying technical levels. These tech talks, led by AWS solutions architects and engineers, feature technical deep dives, live demonstrations, customer examples, and Q&A with AWS experts. Register now!

Note – All sessions are free and in Pacific Time.

Tech talks this month:

Compute

March 26, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTTechnical Deep Dive: Running Amazon EC2 Workloads at Scale – Learn how you can optimize your workloads running on Amazon EC2 for cost and performance, all while handling peak demand.

March 27, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTIntroduction to AWS Outposts – Learn how you can run AWS infrastructure on-premises with AWS Outposts for a truly consistent hybrid experience.

March 28, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTDeep Dive on OpenMPI and Elastic Fabric Adapter (EFA) – Learn how you can optimize your workloads running on Amazon EC2 for cost and performance, all while handling peak demand.

Containers

March 21, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTRunning Kubernetes with Amazon EKS – Learn how to run Kubernetes on AWS with Amazon EKS.

March 22, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive Into Container Networking – Dive deep into microservices networking and how you can build, secure, and manage the communications into, out of, and between the various microservices that make up your application.

Data Lakes & Analytics

March 19, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTFuzzy Matching and Deduplicating Data with ML Transforms for AWS Lake Formation – Learn how to use ML Transforms for AWS Glue to link and de-duplicate matching records.

March 20, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTCustomer Showcase: Perform Real-time ETL from IoT Devices into your Data Lake with Amazon Kinesis – Learn best practices for how to perform real-time extract-transform-load into your data lake with Amazon Kinesis.

March 20, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTMachine Learning Powered Business Intelligence with Amazon QuickSight – Learn how Amazon QuickSight leverages powerful ML and natural language capabilities to generate insights that help you discover the story behind the numbers.

Databases

March 18, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTWhat’s New in PostgreSQL 11 – Find out what’s new in PostgreSQL 11, the latest major version of the popular open source database, and learn about AWS services for running highly available PostgreSQL databases in the cloud.

March 19, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTIntroduction on Migrating your Oracle/SQL Server Databases over to the Cloud using AWS’s New Workload Qualification Framework – Get an introduction on how AWS’s Workload Qualification Framework can help you with your application and database migrations.

March 20, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTWhat’s New in MySQL 8 – Find out what’s new in MySQL 8, the latest major version of the world’s most popular open source database, and learn about AWS services for running highly available MySQL databases in the cloud.

March 21, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTBuilding Scalable & Reliable Enterprise Apps with AWS Relational Databases – Learn how AWS Relational Databases can help you build scalable & reliable enterprise apps.

DevOps

March 19, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTIntroduction to Amazon Corretto: A No-Cost Distribution of OpenJDK – Learn how to transform your approach to secure desktop delivery with a cloud desktop solution like Amazon WorkSpaces.

End-User Computing

March 28, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTFireside Chat: Enabling Today’s Workforce with Cloud Desktops – Learn about the tools and best practices Amazon Redshift customers can use to scale storage and compute resources on-demand and automatically to handle growing data volume and analytical demand.

Enterprise

March 26, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTSpeed Your Cloud Computing Journey With the Customer Enablement Services of AWS: ProServe, AMS, and Support – Learn how to accelerate your cloud journey with AWS’s Customer Enablement Services.

IoT

March 26, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTHow to Deploy AWS IoT Greengrass Using Docker Containers and Ubuntu-snap – Learn how to bring cloud services to the edge using containerized microservices by deploying AWS IoT Greengrass to your device using Docker containers and Ubuntu snaps.

Machine Learning

March 18, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTOrchestrate Machine Learning Workflows with Amazon SageMaker and AWS Step Functions – Learn about how ML workflows can be orchestrated with the rich features of Amazon SageMaker and AWS Step Functions.

March 21, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTExtract Text and Data from Any Document with No Prior ML Experience – Learn how to extract text and data from any document with no prior machine learning experience.

March 22, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild Forecasts and Individualized Recommendations with AI – Learn how you can build accurate forecasts and individualized recommendation systems using our new AI services, Amazon Forecast and Amazon Personalize.

Management Tools

March 29, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PTDeep Dive on Inventory Management and Configuration Compliance in AWS – Learn how AWS helps with effective inventory management and configuration compliance management of your cloud resources.

Networking & Content Delivery

March 25, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTApplication Acceleration and Protection with Amazon CloudFront, AWS WAF, and AWS Shield – Learn how to secure and accelerate your applications using AWS’s Edge services in this demo-driven tech talk.

Robotics

March 28, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTBuild a Robot Application with AWS RoboMaker – Learn how to improve your robotics application development lifecycle with AWS RoboMaker.

Security, Identity, & Compliance

March 27, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PTRemediating Amazon GuardDuty and AWS Security Hub Findings – Learn how to build and implement remediation automations for Amazon GuardDuty and AWS Security Hub.

March 27, 2019 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM PTScaling Accounts and Permissions Management – Learn how to scale your accounts and permissions management efficiently as you continue to move your workloads to AWS Cloud.

Serverless

March 18, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PT Testing and Deployment Best Practices for AWS Lambda-Based Applications – Learn best practices for testing and deploying AWS Lambda based applications.

Storage

March 25, 2019 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PT Introducing a New Cost-Optimized Storage Class for Amazon EFS – Come learn how the new Amazon EFS storage class and Lifecycle Management automatically reduces cost by up to 85% for infrequently accessed files.

Categories: Cloud

Bulgaria PHP Conference 2019

PHP News - Sun, 03/03/2019 - 03:37
Categories: PHP

New – RISC-V Support in the FreeRTOS Kernel

AWS Blog - Tue, 02/26/2019 - 09:09

FreeRTOS is a popular operating system designed for small, simple processors often known as microcontrollers. It is available under the MIT open source license and runs on many different Instruction Set Architectures (ISAs). Amazon FreeRTOS extends FreeRTOS with a collection of IoT-oriented libraries that provide additional networking and security features including support for Bluetooth Low Energy, Over-the-Air Updates, and Wi-Fi.

RISC-V is a free and open ISA that was designed to be simple, extensible, and easy to implement. The simplicity of the RISC-V model, coupled with its permissive BSD license, makes it ideal for a wide variety of processors, including low-cost microcontrollers that can be manufactured without incurring license costs. The RISC-V model can be implemented in many different ways, as you can see from the RISC-V cores page. Development tools, including simulators, compilers, and debuggers, are also available.

Today I am happy to announce that we are now providing RISC-V support in the FreeRTOS kernel. The kernel supports the RISC-V I profile (RV32I and RV64I) and can be extended to support any RISC-V microcontroller. It includes preconfigured examples for the OpenISA VEGAboard, QEMU emulator for SiFive’s HiFive board, and Antmicro’s Renode emulator for the Microchip M2GL025 Creative Board.

You now have a powerful new option for building smart devices that are more cost-effective than ever before!

Jeff;

 

Categories: Cloud

Remembering Rachel Olivero

Drupal News - Fri, 02/22/2019 - 06:23


Rachel Olivero, courtesy of National Federation of the Blind

Earlier this month we saw the passing of Rachel Olivero. Rachel touched a lot of people in both the Drupal and accessibility communities. She worked at the National Federation of the Blind, as the Director of Organizational Technology. I am not sure that this is where she was first exposed to Drupal, but she became involved in the community after attending DrupalCon in her hometown of Baltimore in 2017. It was there where she participated in her first code sprint and contributed her first bug report.

After attending the first-ever Nonprofit Summit at DrupalCon Baltimore, Rachel stepped up to lead an accessibility breakout at DrupalCon Nashville. She was always willing to share her knowledge and never got annoyed no matter how many times she was asked her whether the <aside> element was ever useful to a screen reader. Fortunately, about 20 minutes of the accessibility roundtable was recorded. She engaged with a few folks throughout the week, many remember her from Drupal Trivia Night.

As a technical user who was blind, her opinion was sought often in the Slack Channel. She also engaged with the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion team.  Rachel was active in Twitter and other social media platforms too, where she engaged with other members of the Drupal community. As a person who was blind, transgender, and a lesbian, Rachel understood a lot about the importance of diversity.

Rachel became involved in the NTEN Drupal Community of Practice calls a few years ago, when she came on a monthly call to share some accessibility knowledge. Subsequently, she became a more regular attendee of these calls. Johanna Bates and Rachel were slated to co-present a session on accessible content entry for content editors at the upcoming NTEN 19NTC in Portland. This would have been her first ever NTEN NTC.

Rachel also served on the NTEN NTC’s first-ever accessibility committee, contributing her knowledge to making conferences more accessible. This is a perfect example of how willing Rachel was to share her expertise and experience with others. She was generous with her knowledge, kind, collaborative, and extremely funny. The loss of her warmth, humor, and brilliance in the Drupal community, the nonprofit tech community, and in the a11y community is a massive and sad loss.

This fall Rachel contributed an article to the latest 24 accessibility series, Not Your Father’s Navigation Strategy: There’s More Than Just the TAB Key. She argued for developers to invest in proper semantic markup so that screen reader users can make full use of their assistive technology. This annual series of articles really draws on a Who's Who of accessibility.

Rachel was also the president of the NFB’s Amateur Radio Division. As a modern HAM enthusiast, she was active on GitHub working to create a Software-defined radio (SDR) scanner that could continuously record a set of frequencies for on-demand playback. She was interested in public safety.

Rachel had been working on NFB.org’s new Drupal 8 site for a long time. She was so excited to see it launch at the end of January. Rachel had recently been promoted at the NFB to Director of Technology.  This launch was a huge piece of her work, and the site looks amazing. It is terrific to see how she was able to modernize the NFB’s website and leverage Drupal to help her create a modern responsive website.

As Rachel said in an NFB Facebook campaign:

“I’m lucky, and thankful, that blindness hasn’t caused a lot of resistance in my life. From the support of family during my early years to the encouragement of friends, to the emergency management director who I never saw blink an eye when I said, “I want to take the CERT class. You can teach me to get people out from under a collapsed wall too, right?” to all those who supported my gender transition. I’ve generally never felt that I couldn’t do something as a blind person. However, it’s the love, hope, and determination of my family in the National Federation of the Blind, that has given me the extra strength and answered the, ‘but how do I…” And that is #WhyImAFederationist

Rachel was also quoted in a very recent Vox.com article by s.e. smith, Websites need to be more accessible for disabled people.  Rachel clearly identified that “Accessibility is still a sidebar when it comes to web development.”

A few community members shared memories of Rachel:

What I admired most about Rachel was her willingness to help at any level necessary and the kindness with which she acted.  She was enthusiastic about building community and eager to contribute. She regularly gave time, experience, resources (like her server space, and other infrastructure) and energy to connecting people and working for a future in which technology would be accessible to all.  Her unique perspective brought insight, empathy and patience to her work, and I’m sad that the world has lost such a passionate champion for inclusion. 

- Nikki Stevens (drnikki)

Rachel was the kind of person who immediately made you feel at ease when you were spending time with her, even if you had just met. She was great about making sure that nobody got left out, and was quick to invite new or shy people at events who might have eaten alone to come sit with her and her friends instead.

She was generous with her time whenever I asked to bounce an idea off of her to see if what I was considering suggesting would actually be helpful for the blind community or not, and she never made me feel like a bother when I asked for her thoughts. To the contrary, she always seemed happy to help. She was encouraging when I was right, and gracious when I was wrong; she never made me feel stupid about an idea if I was off-base, and instead provided valuable insight that I apply to my work to this day.

Rachel was an awesome woman, and I wish that we had gotten to spend more time together. The Drupal community (and the world at large) will definitely be feeling her loss. I hope that we can all put what she has given to each of us to good use to carry forward what was always her mission - to make the world better for people. 

- Helena McCabe (helenasue)

Rachel Olivero was really an adventurous spirit. I remember a NFB conference several years ago when Rachel mused "I've always wanted to ride a mechanical bull - y'know do as Texans do in Texas".  After fighting the management of the establishment, who were not inclined to let her ride, she got to ride - for a full 30 seconds:-). Everyone at Deque will miss her. Rachel is an inspiration to all those who strive to be true to themselves and the cause of digital equality.
- Preety Kumar

In 2007, Rachel was one of the first accessibility experts I worked with after I joined Deque and I was always impressed with her technical strength and her ability to keep people at the center of any discussion. I remember the demonstration she made to Wal-Mart’s checkout team, that the shopping cart was inaccessible. Their response was getting off-track into technical mumbo-jumbo when Rachel loudly interrupted, “excuse me...excuse me. The point is that I want to put money in your pocket but since the shopping cart won’t work for me, I can’t do that. Do you want me to put my money in Target’s pocket instead?!?!”  I always enjoyed working with her on any project and will miss her.
- Wes Dillon

I enjoyed talking with Rachel at both of her DrupalCons. We mostly talked shop. I was very impressed with her knowledge and patience dealing with people interested in learning. I remember talking about getting organizations like the NFB to approach technology more as makers than consumers. We also talked about challenges with procurement and the work that she was doing to revise how technology was purchased. She seemed hopeful and focused. She was clearly a big thinker.

By being involved in the Drupal community, Rachel reminded a lot of us of the importance of building our tools to work for everyone.

We were all looking forward to working with her more. She will be missed.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial donations be made to the National Federation of the Blind to support projects in which Rachel personally invested her time, treasure, and talent.

Contributions can be mailed to National Federation of the Blind, 200 East Wells Street, Baltimore, Maryland, 21230, or given online at https://nfb.org/donate.

Categories: Drupal

Get to know the newest AWS Heroes – Winter 2019

AWS Blog - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 14:18

AWS Heroes are superusers who possess advanced technical skills and are early adopters of emerging technologies. Heroes are passionate about sharing their extensive AWS knowledge with others. Some get involved in-person by running meetups, workshops, and speaking at conferences, while others share with online AWS communities via social media, blog posts, and open source contributions.

2019 is off to a roaring start and we’re thrilled to introduce you to the latest AWS Heroes:

Aileen Gemma Smith
Ant Stanley
Gaurav Kamboj
Jeremy Daly
Kurt Lee
Matt Weagle
Shingo Yoshida

Aileen Gemma Smith – Sydney, Australia

Community Hero Aileen Gemma Smith is the founder and CEO of Vizalytics Technology. The team at Vizalytics serves public and private sector clients worldwide in transportation, tourism, and economic development. She shared their story in the Building Complex Workloads in the Cloud session, at AWS Canberra Summit 2017. Aileen has a keen interest in diversity and inclusion initiatives and is constantly working to elevate the work and voices of underestimated engineers and founders. At AWS Public Sector Summit Canberra in 2018, she was a panelist for We Power Tech, Inclusive Conversations with Women in Technology. She has supported and encouraged the creation of internships and mentoring programs for high school and university students with a focus on building out STEAM initiatives.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Ant Stanley – London, United Kingdom

Serverless Hero Ant Stanley is a consultant and community organizer. He founded and currently runs the Serverless London user group, and he is part of the ServerlessDays London organizing team and the global ServerlessDays leadership team. Previously, Ant was a co-founder of A Cloud Guru, and responsible for organizing the first Serverlessconf event in New York in May 2016. Living in London since 2009, Ant’s background before serverless is primarily as a solutions architect at various organizations, from managed service providers to Tier 1 telecommunications providers. His current focus is serverless, GraphQL, and Node.js.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gaurav Kamboj – Mumbai, India

Community Hero Gaurav Kamboj is a cloud architect at Hotstar, India’s leading OTT provider with a global concurrency record for live streaming to 11Mn+ viewers. At Hotstar, he loves building cost-efficient infrastructure that can scale to millions in minutes. He is also passionate about chaos engineering and cloud security. Gaurav holds the original “all-five” AWS certifications, is co-founder of AWS User Group Mumbai, and speaks at local tech conferences. He also conducts guest lectures and workshops on cloud computing for students at engineering colleges affiliated with the University of Mumbai.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeremy Daly – Boston, USA

Serverless Hero Jeremy Daly is the CTO of AlertMe, a startup based in NYC that uses machine learning and natural language processing to help publishers better connect with their readers. He began building cloud-based applications with AWS in 2009. After discovering Lambda, became a passionate advocate for FaaS and managed services. He now writes extensively about serverless on his blog, jeremydaly.com, and publishes Off-by-none, a weekly newsletter that focuses on all things serverless. As an active member of the serverless community, Jeremy contributes to a number of open-source serverless projects, and has created several others, including Lambda API, Serverless MySQL, and Lambda Warmer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurt Lee – Seoul, South Korea

Serverless Hero Kurt Lee works at Vingle Inc. as their tech lead. As one of the original team members, he has been involved in nearly all backend applications there. Most recently, he led Vingle’s full migration to serverless, cutting 40% of the server cost. He’s known for sharing his experience of adapting serverless, along with its technical and organizational value, through Medium. He and his team maintain multiple open-source projects, which they developed during the migration. Kurt hosts TechTalk@Vingle regularly, and often presents at AWSKRUG about various aspects of serverless and pushing more things to serverless.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt Weagle – Seattle, USA

Serverless Hero Matt Weagle leverages machine learning, serverless techniques, and a servicefull mindset at Lyft, to create innovative transportation experiences in an operationally sustainable and secure manner. Matt looks to serverless as a way to increase collaboration across development, operational, security, and financial concerns and support rapid business-value creation. He has been involved in the serverless community for several years. Currently, he is the organizer of Serverless – Seattle and co-organizer of the serverlessDays Seattle event. He writes about serverless topics on Medium and Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shingo Yoshida – Tokyo, Japan

Serverless Hero Shingo Yoshida is the CEO of Section-9, CTO of CYDAS, as well as a founder of Serverless Community(JP) and a member of JAWS-UG (AWS User Group – Japan). Since 2012, Shingo has not only built a system with just AWS, but has also built with a cloud-native architecture to make his customers happy. Serverless Community(JP) was established in 2016, and meetups have been held 20 times in Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka, and Sapporo, including three full-day conferences. Through this community, thousands of participants have discovered the value of serverless. Shingo has contributed to these serverless scenes with many blog posts and books about serverless, including Serverless Architectures on AWS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are now 80 AWS Heroes worldwide. Learn about all of them and connect with an AWS Hero.

Categories: Cloud

Podcast #299: February 2019 Updates

AWS Blog - Mon, 02/18/2019 - 07:39

Simon guides you through lots of new features, services and capabilities that you can take advantage of. Including the new AWS Backup service, more powerful GPU capabilities, new SLAs and much, much more!

Chapters:

Service Level Agreements 0:17
Storage 0:57
Media Services 5:08
Developer Tools 6:17
Analytics 9:54
AI/ML 12:07
Database 14:47
Networking & Content Delivery 17:32
Compute 19:02
Solutions 21:57
Business Applications 23:38
AWS Cost Management 25:07
Migration & Transfer 25:39
Application Integration 26:07
Management & Governance 26:32
End User Computing 29:22

Additional Resources

Topic || Service Level Agreements 0:17

Topic || Storage 0:57

Topic || Media Services 5:08

Topic || Developer Tools 6:17

Topic || Analytics 9:54

Topic || AI/ML 12:07

Topic || Database 14:47

Topic || Networking and Content Delivery 17:32

Topic || Compute 19:02

Topic || Solutions 21:57

Topic || Business Applications 23:38

Topic || AWS Cost Management 25:07

Topic || Migration and Transfer 25:39

Topic || Application Integration 26:07

Topic || Management and Governance 26:32

Topic || End User Computing 29:22

About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you. Subscribe with one of the following:

Like the Podcast?

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to awspodcast@amazon.com. We want to hear from you!

Categories: Cloud

Longhorn PHP 2019 Schedule

PHP News - Thu, 02/14/2019 - 07:03
Categories: PHP

Podcast 298: [Public Sector Special Series #6] – Bringing the White House to the World

AWS Blog - Thu, 02/14/2019 - 06:40

Dr. Stephanie Tuszynski (Director of the Digital Library – White House Historical Association) speaks about how they used AWS to bring the experience of the White House to the world.

Additional Resources About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you. Subscribe with one of the following:

Like the Podcast?

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to awspodcast@amazon.com. We want to hear from you!

Categories: Cloud

Now Available – Five New Amazon EC2 Bare Metal Instances: M5, M5d, R5, R5d, and z1d

AWS Blog - Thu, 02/14/2019 - 05:09

Today we are launching the five new EC2 bare metal instances that I promised you a few months ago. Your operating system runs on the underlying hardware and has direct access to the processor and other hardware. The instances are powered by AWS-custom Intel® Xeon® Scalable Processor (Skylake) processors that deliver sustained all-core Turbo performance.

Here are the specs:

Instance Name Sustained All-Core Turbo
Logical Processors Memory Local Storage EBS-Optimized Bandwidth Network Bandwidth m5.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 384 GiB – 14 Gbps 25 Gbps m5d.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 384 GiB 4 x 900 GB NVMe SSD 14 Gbps 25 Gbps r5.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 768 GiB – 14 Gbps 25 Gbps r5d.metal Up to 3.1 GHz 96 768 GiB 4 x 900 GB NVMe SSD 14 Gbps 25 Gbps z1d.metal Up to 4.0 GHz 48 384 GiB 2 x 900 GB NVMe SSD 14 Gbps 25 Gbps

The M5 instances are designed for general-purpose workloads, such as web and application servers, gaming servers, caching fleets, and app development environments. The R5 instances are designed for high performance databases, web scale in-memory caches, mid-sized in-memory databases, real-time big data analytics, and other memory-intensive enterprise applications. The M5d and R5d variants also include 3.6 TB of local NVMe SSD storage.

z1d instances provide high compute performance and lots of memory, making them ideal for electronic design automation (EDA) and relational databases with high per-core licensing costs. The high CPU performance allows you to license fewer cores and significantly reduce your TCO for Oracle or SQL Server workloads.

All of the instances are powered by the AWS Nitro System, with dedicated hardware accelerators for EBS processing (including crypto operations), the software-defined network inside of each Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), ENA networking, and access to the local NVMe storage on the M5d, R5d, and z1d instances. Bare metal instances can also take advantage of Elastic Load Balancing, Auto Scaling, Amazon CloudWatch, and other AWS services.

In addition to being a great home for old-school applications and system software that are licensed specifically and exclusively for use on physical, non-virtualized hardware, bare metal instances can be used to run tools and applications that require access to low-level processor features such as performance counters. For example, Mozilla’s Record and Replay Framework (rr) records and replays program execution with low overhead, using the performance counters to measure application performance and to deliver signals and context-switch events with high fidelity. You can read their paper, Engineering Record And Replay For Deployability, to learn more.

Launch One Today
m5.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (N. California and Oregon), Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, London, Paris, and Stockholm), and Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, Singapore, Sydney, and Tokyo) AWS regions.

m5d.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (Oregon), Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, Paris, and Stockholm), and Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, Singapore, and Sydney) AWS regions.

r5.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (N. California and Oregon), Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, Paris, and Stockholm), Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, and Singapore), and AWS GovCloud (US-West) AWS regions.

r5d.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia and Ohio), US West (N. California), Europe (Frankfurt, Paris, and Stockholm), Asia Pacific (Mumbai, Seoul, and Singapore), and AWS GovCloud (US-West) AWS regions.

z1d.metal instances are available in the US East (N. Virginia), US West (N. California and Oregon), Europe (Ireland), and Asia Pacific (Singapore and Tokyo) AWS regions.

The bare metal instances will become available in even more AWS regions as soon as possible.

Jeff;

 

Categories: Cloud

New – Infrequent Access Storage Class for Amazon Elastic File System (EFS)

AWS Blog - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 12:44

Amazon Elastic File System lets you create petabyte-scale file systems that can be accessed in massively parallel fashion from hundreds or thousands of EC2 instances and on-premises servers, while scaling on demand without disrupting applications. Since the mid-2016 launch of EFS, we have added many new features including encryption of data at rest and in transit, a provisioned throughput option when you need high throughput access to a set of files that do not occupy a lot of space, on-premises access via AWS Direct Connect, EFS File Sync, support for AWS VPN and Inter-Region VPC Peering, and more.

Infrequent Access Storage Class
Today I would like to tell you about the new Amazon EFS Infrequent Access storage class, as pre-announced at AWS re:Invent. As part of a new Lifecycle Management option for EFS file systems, you can now indicate that you want to move files that have not been accessed in the last 30 days to a storage class that is 85% less expensive. You can enable the use of Lifecycle Management when you create a new EFS file system, and you can enable it later for file systems that were created on or after today’s launch.

The new storage class is totally transparent. You can still access your files as needed and in the usual way, with no code or operational changes necessary.

You can use the Infrequent Access storage class to meet auditing and retention requirements, create nearline backups that can be recovered using normal file operations, and to keep data close at hand that you need on an occasional basis.

Here are a couple of things to keep in mind:

Eligible Files – Files that are 128 KiB or larger and that have not been accessed or modified for at least 30 days can be transitioned to the new storage class. Modifications to a file’s metadata that do not change the file will not delay a transition.

Priority – Operations that transition files to Infrequent Access run at a lower priority than other operations on the file system.

Throughput – If your file system is configured for Bursting mode, the amount of Standard storage determines the throughput. Otherwise, the provisioned throughput applies.

Enabling Lifecycle Management
You can enable Lifecycle Management and benefit from the Infrequent Access storage class with one click:

As I noted earlier, you can check this when you create the file system, or you can enable it later for file systems that you create from now on.

Files that have not been read or written for 30 days will be transitioned to the Infrequent Access storage class with no further action on your part. Files in the Standard Access class can be accessed with latency measured in single-digit milliseconds; files in the Infrequent Access class have latency in the low double-digits. Your next AWS bill will include information on your use of both storage classes, so that you can see your cost savings.

Available Now
This feature is available now and you can start using it today in all AWS Regions where EFS is available. Infrequent Access storage is billed at $0.045 per GB/Month in US East (N. Virginia), with correspondingly low pricing in other regions. There’s also a data transfer charge of $0.01 per GB for reads and writes to Infrequent Access storage.

Like every AWS service and feature, we are launching with an initial set of features and a really strong roadmap! For example, we are working on additional lifecycle management flexibility, and would be very interested in learning more about what kinds of times and rules you would like.

Jeff;

PS – AWS DataSync will help you to quickly and easily automate data transfer between your existing on-premises storage and EFS.

Categories: Cloud

Podcast #297: Reinforcement Learning with AWS DeepRacer

AWS Blog - Mon, 02/11/2019 - 09:52

How are ML Models Trained? How can developers learn different approaches to solving business problems? How can we race model cars on a global scale? Todd Escalona (Solutions Architect Evangelist, AWS) joins Simon to dive into reinforcement learning and AWS DeepRacer!

Additional Resources About the AWS Podcast

The AWS Podcast is a cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you. Subscribe with one of the following:

Like the Podcast?

Rate us on iTunes and send your suggestions, show ideas, and comments to awspodcast@amazon.com. We want to hear from you!

Categories: Cloud

PHP.Barcelona 2019

PHP News - Thu, 02/07/2019 - 07:22
Categories: PHP

PHP 7.2.15 Released

PHP News - Thu, 02/07/2019 - 03:30
Categories: PHP

Pages

Subscribe to LAMP, Database and Cloud Technical Information aggregator


Main menu 2

by Dr. Radut